Case study – the sports bar – part two – website optimisation

Limited by the brief (and time and budget) to reworking the existing design, rather than replace with a WordPress driven site (my personal preference), below is a list of the basic SEO and general site changes I made.

  1. More meaningful title tags, meta descriptions and keywords
  2. Logo/header graphic turned back into a single image and named more explicitly (no longer img01.gif, img02.gif).
  3. Replaced Flash navigation with text links
  4. Homepage now contains the text that had previously been on the About page and a smaller image rather than just an image and no text.
  5. Renamed a couple of menu items to make more sense to users (Live Sports > What’s On, Events > Specials [the word for special offers in Czech is the same as the word for events, essentially this was a mistranslation])
  6. Changed from static html to php so we can use includes for header and footer information, making further edits easier
  7. Navigation inconsistencies (opening a new window for the food and drinks menu pages) have been corrected.
  8. Removed Flash audio player
  9. Switched Flash schedule player for a simple text file include, schedule now displays on the page, as text, and is searchable.
  10. Added a Google Map to the contact page – there was no map there previously.
  11. Google Analytics tracking code added for ease of statistics monitoring.

Based on the first few days of stats from Analytics we will be able to judge the efficacy of these changes. The initial keywords that are bringing in traffic are purely the name of the bar – serving to highlight that the site’s SEO was pretty poor. The Pagerank as of today is 2/10 and the site is not coming up in the first few pages of organic search results (SERPS). I will cover how this situation has changed in a month or so.

4 thoughts on “Case study – the sports bar – part two – website optimisation”

  1. But why would you use WordPress for a site like this? There is much better and appropriate CMS than WordPress. That is best suited to blogs. Why would you want to use a CMS at all for a site like this? Do you expect the customer to add content?

  2. But why would you use WordPress for a site like this? There is much better and appropriate CMS than WordPress. That is best suited to blogs. Why would you want to use a CMS at all for a site like this? Do you expect the customer to add content?

  3. One of the client’s issues with the present site is that they have very limited ability to update the content themselves. Whilst a blog platform isn’t necessarily the best approach, I’ve found WordPress sufficiently versatile and well supported that it does everything they want and more. That I am familiar with it is another plus – I don’t want to learn another CMS just for this one client.

  4. One of the client’s issues with the present site is that they have very limited ability to update the content themselves. Whilst a blog platform isn’t necessarily the best approach, I’ve found WordPress sufficiently versatile and well supported that it does everything they want and more. That I am familiar with it is another plus – I don’t want to learn another CMS just for this one client.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *